The University Sector

MARCH 27
AUSTERITY AND ONTARIO UNIVERSITIES: FINDING A WAY FORWARD
7 pm – 9 pm
OISE AUDITORIUM
Torono, 252 Bloor Street

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Post-Secondary Education section of CUPE Ontario website

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Austerity, Ontario and Post-Secondary Education: The Case of “Canada’s Capital University”

Carlo Fanelli and James Meades

Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies Volume 9, Number 2(November 2011)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

TAKE A HIKE! Read a report by CCPA on the affordability of education.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

You can read the the recently released discussion paper Strengthening Ontario’s Centres of Creativity, Innovation and Knowledge here.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

November 2nd, 2012 Friday

The Ontario University Workers Coordinating Committee [OUWCC], held Coordinated Bargaining Meeting

at the Sheraton Centre in Toronto. On the Agenda is discussion of the sectoral approach to restructuring of the post-secondary sector as proposed by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. The MTCU document is available here.  The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives [CCPA] response, Eduflation and the High Cost of Learning, can be read here.

The Local excecutive committee is sending representatives to attend the meeting.The changes to the post-secondary education [PSE] sector are sweeping and negatively affecting both the students and the academic, maintenance and administrative support workers. For example, a recent article in the Globe and Mail, The Learning Curve: reinventing higher education (Oct. 6, 2012) asks questions about the directions the PSE system should take while obfuscating the socio-economic context that underpins such decision making. The article dovetails the governmental support for deregulation and hierarchical differentiation of the PSE system using appealing language, such as effectiveness, competitiveness, accountability,  or the need to individualize fee payers’ choices. The role of the OUWCC sectoral committee of CUPE is to lay bare the impetus behind these changes and thus equip the students and the PSE workers with tools that may help them to decide upon their own response.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

July 04, 2012 14:16 ET

St. Michael’s College Bargaining Hits Impasse

Union Concerned About Bullying /Sexual Harassment Protection

TORONTO, ONTARIO–(Marketwire – July 4, 2012) – CUPE 3902 represents the newly unionized contract instructional staff at the University of St. Michael’s College at the University of Toronto. We are in the 37th week of bargaining for a new collective agreement and have hit an impasse.

The employer’s representatives have drawn a line in the sand by refusing to accept basic human rights language that protects workers from bullying and sexual harassment. These protections include the inadmissibility of a complainant’s personal background or lifestyle during sexual harassment grievances and the protection of witnesses during sexual harassment or bullying complaints from academic or institutional reprisals. These protections are in place in 3902’s three other Collective Agreements at U of T.

“Society as a whole has come to recognize that sexual harassment and bullying have no place in the workplace. It is of concern to CUPE 3902 that St. Michael’s bargaining representatives appear to be lagging behind societal norms,” says Dr. Leslie Jermyn Chief Negotiator of CUPE 3902 Unit 4.

The Union has several other concerns including the employer’s bargaining representative’s refusal to commit to exercising management rights in a way that is fair, reasonable, and equitable. CUPE 3902 is of the opinion that St. Michael’s College, as a Catholic institution, not only has the opportunity to be a fair and equitable employer but also to bear witness to the importance of workplace justice.

“We risk undermining our capacity to serve as witnesses to the world, if we cannot even secure justice in our own backyard,” says Dr. Daniel Bader, Chair of Unit 4’s Bargaining Committee and sessional instructor at St. Michael’s.

CUPE 3902 is unable to move forward on substantive issues such as wages and benefits until these human rights issues have been addressed. The Union has sent out an open letter to St. Michael’s College’s Collegium informing it of their concerns. A copy of the letter can be found at: www.cupe3902.org. In addition, over the next several weeks CUPE 3902 will be communicating with members of the St. Michael’s community, including regular faculty, students and donors, about our concerns.

The CUPE 3902 bargaining team members are available for comment and interview. You may contact us at:St.Michaels@cupe3902.org

Contact Information

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Are shorter university degrees in Ontario’s future?  (or an efficiency plan for the sausage factory)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

UNDER PRESSURE

From the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Over the past two decades, Ontario’s system of financing higher education has become more regressive, exploiting already over-stretched families who want to help their children pursue their educational aspirations. In 1990, a middle-income family in Ontario could earn the equivalent of four years of tuition fees in 87 days; it will take 195 days in 2011. The situation is even more dire for low-income families who are looking at the equivalent of two years of income for four years of tuition fees in 2011.

By forcing all but the wealthiest families to play priority roulette, assume still more debt, or make the difficult decision that higher education is too great a financial burden to bear, Ontario is hampering its economic and educational potential, and we are all paying the price.

There are alternatives: this study shows how the government of Ontario can maximize investment benefits and create a highly educated populace not overburdened with debt, and in so doing help ensure that university is affordable to students and their families regardless of income.

To download the report go here.

STUDENT PROTEST QUEBEC 2012  

CLASSE La Coalition large de l’Association pour une  solidarite syndicale etudiante.

Disdain, Discrimination, Violence: Students deserve better than this

Students reject agreement

Assault on public education

Defiant Quebec students government’s shabby offer

Quebec students call for a social strike in solidarity with their struggle

Red felt scarce in Montreal

The origin of the red square

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

http://www.isa-sociology.org/universities-in-crisis/

This weekend April 27 – 29 in Toronto:

The University is Ours!: a conference on struggles within and beyond the neoliberal university.

View poster.